Dating and atheist

13-Feb-2018 03:30 by 9 Comments

Dating and atheist - world of dating relationships and love

The Pew Research Center recently released a report indicating that “.” This is good news because it shows that people are less likely to identify with a restricting dogma, but it doesn’t mean religion is coming to an end any time soon.In fact, more than 70 percent of American citizens still identify as Christians while the “unaffiliated” make up only 22 percent and atheists only three percent.

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You can’t remove religions by force, either by banning them or by killing those who believe, because the feelings and circumstances that caused us to create them have remained largely unchanged for hundreds of thousands of years.

But calling religion a implies that it is always bad in all circumstances – that it isn’t beneficial to anyone and is dangerous in all its forms. He is quoted as saying, “.” He went on to explain that “more people are dying as a result of our religious myths than any other ideology.” While I agree with Harris that religious extremism is dangerous, I don’t think religion itself is inherently evil and I certainly wouldn’t say it’s worse than rape.

Religion isn’t a crime or a violation – it’s a tool.

The urge to believe still exists inside the minds of people, as does our desire to know “the unknown.” The fact is that we will probably never completely outgrow religion.

We are prone to superstition, organization, and wishful thinking — and religions are often forged when those tendencies are realized.

Some anti-theists hope to outlaw faith by enacting some sort of (unenforceable) thoughtcrime legislation, others think ridicule alone will completely eradicate supernatural beliefs, and a small number of these anti-theists want to end religion so badly that they see violence as the answer.

Recently, I was approached by a self-described anti-theist who suggested that killing every single religious person – man, woman, and child – was a viable “cure for religion.” This would be almost negligible if it were just a one-off occurrence, or if the person was saying it for shock value, but I’ve heard this proposal a number of times and this particular individual stressed his military background and demanded a logical rebuttal to his position.

I told him that killing all religious people to end religion isn’t just a disturbing thought, it also wouldn’t work. As someone who studies comparative religion, the idea of obliterating faith-based practices through genocide is especially confusing.

It is well established that religion itself is a cultural universal and that it likely has or had evolutionary benefits, so why wouldn’t new religions arise after the mass deaths?

It’s been used to justify violence and bigotry, yes, but (due to the contradictory nature of holy texts) it’s also used at times as a means to promote well-being and reinforce positive ethics.

To answer the rape or religion question simply, think about all of the instances in which you think rape is completely acceptable and then compare that to the number of times when religious people are harmless.

I partly understand the assumption because I know a lot of non-believers who want to do exactly that.